It’s time to talk about fertility at work

A report by Carrot Fertility and RESOLVE

In recent years, conversations about fertility have entered the mainstream. We discuss fertility treatments at the dinner table with our partners, talk about egg or sperm freezing at brunch with our friends, and learn about the fertility struggles of athletes and celebrities in the news and on social media. However, there is still one place where fertility remains taboo — the workplace. Why?

In recent years, conversations about fertility have entered the mainstream. We discuss fertility treatments at the dinner table with our partners, talk about egg or sperm freezing at brunch with our friends, and learn about the fertility struggles of athletes and celebrities in the news and on social media. However, there is still one place where fertility remains taboo — the workplace. Why?

Infertility is common. One in eight couples experience infertility in the U.S., outpacing diseases like diabetes and cancer. 50 million couples worldwide experience infertility. Infertility affects our mental health, prevents us from bringing our best selves to work, influences our career decisions — and can even send us into financial debt. Most insurance companies don’t cover fertility treatments, and if they do, an infertility diagnosis is required, excluding LGBTQ+ people, single intending parents, and more. For those who experience infertility or the challenges of family forming of any kind, the silence can preclude them from seeking the support they need from their employers. And with one third of our lives spent at work and the majority of Americans receiving health insurance through their employer, it makes sense that the workplace plays an important part of a support system.

Infertility is common. One in eight couples experience infertility in the U.S., outpacing diseases like diabetes and cancer. 50 million couples worldwide experience infertility. Infertility affects our mental health, prevents us from bringing our best selves to work, influences our career decisions — and can even send us into financial debt. Most insurance companies don’t cover fertility treatments, and if they do, an infertility diagnosis is required, excluding LGBTQ+ people, single intending parents, and more. For those who experience infertility or the challenges of family forming of any kind, the silence can preclude them from seeking the support they need from their employers. And with one third of our lives spent at work and the majority of Americans receiving health insurance through their employer, it makes sense that the workplace plays an important part of a support system.

We partnered with RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association to survey people on how they feel about fertility topics at work, learn what programs are currently in place, and gain a better understanding of how people can be supported in their fertility and family-forming journeys. Our aim with this report is to use data and stories to shine a light on the importance of supporting employees in their fertility and family-forming journeys at work and normalize conversions about this vital part of human healthcare.

We partnered with RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association to survey people on how they feel about fertility topics at work, learn what programs are currently in place, and gain a better understanding of how people can be supported in their fertility and family-forming journeys. Our aim with this report is to use data and stories to shine a light on the importance of supporting employees in their fertility and family-forming journeys at work and normalize conversions about this vital part of human healthcare.

HIGHLIGHTS
As detailed in this report, the findings from our first annual Fertility at Work Report unearth the trends, priorities, and preferences that govern how we form families against the backdrop of our careers. Read on to better understand the fertility landscape today and what the future holds for employees, employers, and the industry at large.
As detailed in this report, the findings from our first annual Fertility at Work Report unearth the trends, priorities, and preferences that govern how we form families against the backdrop of our careers. Read on to better understand the fertility landscape today and what the future holds for employees, employers, and the industry at large.

Of the respondents, an astounding 89% said that fertility and family forming has negatively impacted their mental health.

59%
Shared that fertility and family forming has impacted their work performance
74%
Said they’ve spent time researching fertility treatments and family forming at work
32%
Said they would go into debt (take out a loan, borrow from family/friends, and/or use credit cards) to pay for fertility care not covered by their benefits
59%
Shared that fertility and family forming has impacted their work performance
74%
Said they’ve spent time researching fertility treatments and family forming at work
32%
Said they would go into debt (take out a loan, borrow from family/friends, and/or use credit cards) to pay for fertility care not covered by their benefits

Ultimately, employees are looking for a fertility
conversation that is open, honest, and free from stigma.

31%
Wouldn’t feel comfortable asking their employer for fertility benefits
77%
Would stay at their company longer if they offered fertility benefits
88%
Would even consider changing jobs for access to fertility benefits
31%
Wouldn’t feel comfortable asking their employer for fertility benefits
77%
Would stay at their company longer if
they offered fertility benefits
88%
Would even consider changing jobs for
access to fertility benefits

COVID-19 didn’t slow down family forming and, in some cases, accelerated it

During COVID-19, fertility clinics abruptly closed, disrupting fertility treatments for people around the world. Family-forming journeys were put on hold. At the same time, millions of people started working from home who hadn’t before. In the face of a global pandemic, fertility care emerged as a core part of people’s healthcare priorities. For our survey respondents, the pandemic largely did not impact family-forming plans — just 8% said that they are delaying parenthood. And for at least some respondents, the pandemic accelerated their decision making — 10% of respondents decided to start fertility treatments because of the increased convenience of doing so while working from home.
People putting together giant puzzle pieces

Was your family-forming journey affected by COVID-19?

No, but I'm thinking about getting a fertility assessment
48%
Yes, I am currently pursuing parenthood
13%
No, I was already pursuing parenthood
48%
Yes, I decided to move forward with fertility treatments because it was more convenient to do so while working at home
10%
No, my family-forming is complete
14%
Yes, I have delayed parenthood
8%
No, I was already pursuing fertility preservation like egg freezing
2%
Yes, I'm considering fertility preservation like egg freezing
<1%
No, I have no plans for parenthood in the near future
2%
No, but I'm thinking about getting a fertility assessment
48%
Yes, I am currently pursuing parenthood
13%
No, I was already pursuing parenthood
48%
Yes, I decided to move forward with fertility treatments because it was more convenient to do so while working at home
10%
No, my family-forming is complete
14%
Yes, I have delayed parenthood
8%
No, I was already pursuing fertility preservation like egg freezing
2%
Yes, I'm considering fertility preservation like egg freezing
<1%
No, I have no plans for parenthood in the near future
2%

There has been progress bringing fertility conversations out in the open, but stigmas
remain in the workplace

While survey respondents generally felt comfortable discussing fertility and family forming with friends, they reported that these topics are rarely talked about in the workplace, whether between colleagues, between an employee and their manager, or from leadership. In fact, 76% of respondents have never heard company leadership use terms such as “infertility,” “IVF,” or “miscarriage.”

The lack of open conversation leads to apprehension regarding time off requests for fertility treatments. When asked why they would feel uncomfortable telling their boss they need time off for fertility treatments, over half said it was because people don't openly talk about fertility at work. Another 34% were concerned it would not be seen as professional, and 30% were worried it would put their job at risk.
People putting together giant puzzle pieces

There has been progress bringing fertility conversations out in the open, but stigmas
remain in the workplace

While survey respondents generally felt comfortable discussing fertility and family forming with friends, they reported that these topics are rarely talked about in the workplace, whether between colleagues, between an employee and their manager, or from leadership. In fact, 76% of respondents have never heard company leadership use terms such as “infertility,” “IVF,” or “miscarriage.”

The lack of open conversation leads to apprehension regarding time off requests for fertility treatments. When asked why they would feel uncomfortable telling their boss they need time off for fertility treatments, over half said it was because people don't openly talk about fertility at work. Another 34% were concerned it would not be seen as professional, and 30% were worried it would put their job at risk.

How comfortable are you sharing your fertility and family-forming journey with your...

100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Family and friends
Colleagues
Manager

Why would you feel uncomfortable talking to your boss about fertility?

56%
Say that people don’t openly talk about fertility at work
34%
Concerned it would not be seen as professional
30%
Say that talking to their boss about fertility treatments would put their job at risk
23%
Say their boss won’t understand
56%
Say that people don’t openly talk about fertility at work
34%
Concerned it would not be seen as professional
30%
Say that talking to their boss about fertility treatments would put their job at risk
23%
Say their boss won’t understand
Where do you give yourself injections?
Only 2% of companies have a designated space where employees feel comfortable giving themselves shots
Where do you give yourself injections?
38% use the bathroom
Where do you give yourself injections?
15.2% use the mother’s room
Where do you give yourself injections?
"I go home"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"The supply closet"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"Before work"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"After work"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"In my car in a parking lot"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"The gas station"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"Empty office"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"Co-workers office"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"A closet"
Where do you give yourself injections?
"There is NO good place to do this!"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
Only 2% of companies have a designated space where
employees feel comfortable giving themselves shots
Where do you give yourself
injections?
38% use the bathroom
Where do you give yourself
injections?
15.2% use the mother’s room
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"I go home"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"The supply closet"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"Before work"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"After work"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"In my car in a parking lot"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"The gas station"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"Empty office"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"Co-workers office"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"A closet"
Where do you give yourself
injections?
"There is NO good place to do this!"

Which of these terms have you heard at work?

100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Infertility
Fertility preservation or Egg Freezing
Sperm Donation
IVF/IUI
Adoption
Egg Donation
Miscarriage
Surrogacy
None of the above

Root canal or fertility treatments?

Fertility treatments are more common, but 62% of people would share dental surgery before disclosing information related to their
fertility.

People are aware of fertility benefits, but coverage varies, is confusing, and is not inclusive of all paths to parenthood

A majority of respondents (79%) were aware of fertility benefits, and more companies offer fertility benefits each year. But many employees remain uncovered, and for those who do have some fertility coverage, options are often limited and confusing. 30% of employees that have fertility benefits are unsure who in the company is covered. 31% of respondents wouldn’t feel comfortable bringing the topic of fertility benefits up with their employer for reasons ranging from not knowing who they should talk with to concerns over confidentiality.
People putting together giant puzzle pieces

Do you have access to fertility benefits through your employer?

55%
Do not have access to benefits
31%
Have some benefits through
company’s health insurance
12%
Have fertility-specific benefits
55%
No, I don't
31%
Have some benefits through
company’s health insurance
12%
Have fertility-specific benefits

For those who have fertility benefits, what do they cover?

Fertility testing
79%
IVF
76%
IUI
78%
Adoption Fees
24%
Cover treatment using donor egg/sperm/embryo
19%
Gestational carrier service
10%

30% don't know who in their company is covered by fertility benefits

For those who have fertility benefits, what do they cover?

Fertility testing
79%
IVF
76%
IUI
78%
Adoption Fees
24%
Cover treatment using donor egg/sperm/embryo
19%
Gestational carrier service
10%

For those who have fertility benefits, what do they cover?

No, but I'm thinking about getting a fertility assessment
79%

30% don't know who in their company is covered by fertility benefits

Do you feel like your company’s benefits are enough to cover all of
your family-forming needs?

Which of these terms have you heard at work?

100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%

Would you feel comfortable asking your employer for fertility benefits?

Yes, I would feel comfortable and have the information I need

to do so
15%
Possibly, I would feel comfortable if I knew others at my company needed them as well
25%
Yes, but I would need additional resources to make my case
24%
No, I wouldn’t feel comfortable asking my employer for help
31%
Yes, I would feel comfortable and have the information I need to do so
15%
Possibly, I would feel comfortable if I knew others at my company needed them as well
25%
Yes, but I would need additional resources to make my case
24%
Yes, I would feel comfortable and have the information I need
to do so
31%

Fertility and family
forming impacts employee
mental health

The financial burden of fertility treatments is known, with the majority of people paying out-of-pocket for their care. In fact, about 80% of people who undergo IVF treatments have hardly any or no coverage. Fertility treatments can have serious emotional and physical impact, as well. One study found that half of women and 15% of men said that infertility was the most upsetting experience of their lives. Not only does it make the pursuit of parenthood that much more overwhelming, but it can also trigger a flood of emotions — shame, guilt, and low self-esteem. These emotions, in turn, may eventually lead to varying degrees of depression and anxiety, both of which can have a cascading effect on work and family life.
People putting together giant puzzle pieces
Said fertility and family forming has negatively impacted their mental health
89%
People putting together giant puzzle pieces

Fertility and family
forming impacts employee
mental health

The financial burden of fertility treatments is known, with the majority of people paying out-of-pocket for their care. In fact, about 80% of people who undergo IVF treatments have hardly any or no coverage. Fertility treatments can have serious emotional and physical impact, as well. One study found that half of women and 15% of men said that infertility was the most upsetting experience of their lives. Not only does it make the pursuit of parenthood that much more overwhelming, but it can also trigger a flood of emotions — shame, guilt, and low self-esteem. These emotions, in turn, may eventually lead to varying degrees of depression and anxiety, both of which can have a cascading effect on work and family life.
Said fertility and family forming has negatively impacted their mental health
89%
People putting together giant puzzle pieces

Fertility and family forming impacts employee
mental health

The financial burden of fertility treatments is known, with the majority of people paying out-of-pocket for their care. In fact, about 80% of people who undergo IVF treatments have hardly any or no coverage. Fertility treatments can have serious emotional and physical impact, as well. One study found that half of women and 15% of men said that infertility was the most upsetting experience of their lives. Not only does it make the pursuit of parenthood that much more overwhelming, but it can also trigger a flood of emotions — shame, guilt, and low self-esteem. These emotions, in turn, may eventually lead to varying degrees of depression and anxiety, both of which can have a cascading effect on work and family life.
Said fertility and family forming has impacted their mental health
89%

Fertility and
family-forming support impacts productivity and influences career decisions

For Millennials and Generation Z, fertility benefits may be the key to attracting great talent, winning the loyalty of current and prospective employees, and keeping people productive and engaged at work. Our survey found that 77% of employees would stay at their company longer if their employer offered fertility benefits. A large majority (88%) would even consider changing jobs for access to fertility benefits, and 74% said they’ve spent time researching fertility treatments and family forming while at work.

Fertility and
family-forming support impacts productivity and influences career decisions

For Millennials and Generation Z, fertility benefits may be the key to attracting great talent, winning the loyalty of current and prospective employees, and keeping people productive and engaged at work. Our survey found that 77% of employees would stay at their company longer if their employer offered fertility benefits. A large majority (88%) would even consider changing jobs for access to fertility benefits, and 74% said they’ve spent time researching fertility treatments and family forming while at work.

74% of respondents have spent time doing research about fertility treatments and family forming while at work.

The majority of people use sick days and PTO for fertility care

<1%
Have fertility-related time off
42%
Use PTO to go to their appointments
27%
Use sick days
8%
Take unpaid leave
24%
Say their company has a flexible leave policy

74% of respondents have spent
time doing research about
fertility treatments and family
forming while at work.

The majority of people use sick days and PTO for fertility care

<1%
Of respondents say their company offers fertility-related time off
42%
Of respondents use PTO to go to their appointments
27%
Of respondents use sick days
8%
Take unpaid leave
24%
Say their company has a flexible leave policy
<1%
Have fertility-related time off
42%
Use PTO to go to their
appointments
27%
Use sick days
8%
Take unpaid leave
24%
Say their company has a
flexible leave policy

59% of respondents said fertility and family forming has impacted their work performance.

Said yes, but that work is understanding
37%
Say their work was impacted, and they worry about job security because of time away
22%
77%
Would stay at their company longer if they offered fertility benefits
88%
Would consider changing jobs
for fertility benefits

Stigma around fertility at work is a global phenomenon

A recent study carried out in Ireland by Carrot partner and leading fertility clinic Sims IVF found that 79% of respondents did not feel adequately supported in their workplace when undergoing fertility treatment. The respondents, who were primarily female (97%), reported being hesitant to approach their male managers, fearing stigma and concerns over the potential impact on promotion and career progression.

30%
Reported that their workplace has no support in place and that fertility is not an encouraged topic of conversation among colleagues and management
32%
Of employees had no knowledge of the support available to them from their employer
35%
Of employees indicated they would not tell their boss or manager if they were undergoing fertility treatment or planning to start a family
30%
Reported that their workplace has no support in place and that fertility is not an encouraged topic of conversation among colleagues and management
32%
Of employees had no knowledge of the support available to them from their employer
35%
Of employees indicated they would not tell their boss or manager if they were undergoing fertility treatment or planning to start a family

People will pay for fertility and family forming but there are lasting financial implications

Fertility and family-forming care is financially out of reach because most people have to pay out-of-pocket for medical treatment and services. The average cost of an IVF cycle is $21,600. More than half of women must undergo a second cycle, and a third will undergo three or more. As a result, people can pay anywhere from $40,000 to $60,000 out-of-pocket for their fertility care. Private adoption costs range from $30,000 to $50,000, and gestational carrier services (commonly known as surrogacy) typically cost between $75,000 - $200,000. With limited fertility coverage, our survey found that nearly 70% of people will dip into, if not drain, their savings or go into debt to pursue parenthood.
People putting together giant puzzle pieces
Will use their savings
37%
Will incur debt
32%
How will you pay?
"Sell our house"
How will you pay?
"Hospital payment plans"
How will you pay?
"Loans"
How will you pay?
"I have applied for many grants"
How will you pay?
"We have been saving for three years"
How will you pay?
"We used our entire savings"
How will you pay?
"Credit cards"
How will you pay?
"A loan from my sister"
How will you pay?
"I borrowed from my family"
How will you pay?
"GoFundMe"
How will you pay?
"A loan from my parents-in-law"
How will you pay?
"Combination of savings, a second job, and grants"
How will you pay?
"My 401k"
How will you pay?
"I moved to a state with mandated coverage"
How will you pay?
"We used our IRAs"
How will you pay?
"I have given up my dream of having children, as I cannot afford treatment"
People putting together giant puzzle pieces

People will pay for fertility and family forming but there are lasting financial implications

Fertility and family-forming care is financially out of reach because most people have to pay out-of-pocket for medical treatment and services. The average cost of an IVF cycle is $21,600. More than half of women must undergo a second cycle, and a third will undergo three or more. As a result, people can pay anywhere from $40,000 to $60,000 out-of-pocket for their fertility care. Private adoption costs range from $30,000 to $50,000, and gestational carrier services (commonly known as surrogacy) typically cost between $75,000 - $200,000. With limited fertility coverage, our survey found that nearly 70% of people will dip into, if not drain, their savings or go into debt to pursue parenthood.
Will use their savings
37%
Will incur debt
32%
How will you pay?
"Sell our house"
How will you pay?
"Hospital payment plans"
How will you pay?
"Loans"
How will you pay?
"I have applied for many grants"
How will you pay?
"We have been saving for three years"
How will you pay?
"We used our entire savings"
How will you pay?
"Credit cards"
How will you pay?
"A loan from my sister"
How will you pay?
"I borrowed from my family"
How will you pay?
"GoFundMe"
How will you pay?
"A loan from my parents-in-law"
How will you pay?
"Combination of savings, a second job, and grants"
How will you pay?
"My 401k"
How will you pay?
"I moved to a state with mandated coverage"
How will you pay?
"We used our IRAs"
How will you pay?
"I have given up my dream of having children, as I cannot afford treatment"

Leadership demographics have little impact on the likelihood of offering
fertility support

Does having leaders that identify as women and/or parents increase the likelihood that a company will support fertility care and family forming? Our results found that there was not, in fact, a correlation between women and parents in leadership and companies that offer fertility benefits.

Carrot pregnancy support

Percentage of companies that offer fertility benefits with women in leadership

In 36.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 0-25% of their leadership team are women
In 24.2% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 26-50% of their leadership team are women
In 12% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 51-75% of their leadership team are women
In 12% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 76% - 100%
In 15.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, respondents didn’t know how many members of their leadership team are women

Percentage of companies that offer fertility benefits with parents in leadership

In 5% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 0-25% of their leadership team are parents
In 9.5% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 26-50% of their leadership team are parents.
In 21.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 51-75% of their leadership team are parents.
In 32.1% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 76-100% of their leadership team are parents.
In 32% of companies that offer fertility benefits, respondents didn’t know what percentage of those in leadership are parents.
Carrot pregnancy support

Leadership demographics have little impact on the likelihood of offering fertility support

Does having leaders that identify as women and/or parents increase the likelihood that a company will support fertility care and family forming? Our results found that there was not, in fact, a correlation between women and parents in leadership and companies that offer fertility benefits.

Percentage of companies that offer fertility benefits with women in leadership

In 36.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 0-25% of their leadership team are women
In 24.2% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 26-50% of their leadership team are women
In 12% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 51-75% of their leadership team are women
In 12% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 76% - 100%
In 15.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, respondents didn’t know how many members of their leadership team are women

Percentage of companies that offer fertility benefits with parents in leadership

In 5% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 0-25% of their leadership team are parents
In 9.5% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 26-50% of their leadership team are parents.
In 21.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 51-75% of their leadership team are parents.
In 32.1% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 76-100% of their leadership team are parents.
In 32% of companies that offer fertility benefits, respondents didn’t know what percentage of those in leadership are parents.

Percentage of companies that offer fertility benefits with parents in leadership

In 5% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 0-25% of their leadership team are parents
In 9.5% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 26-50% of their leadership team are parents.
In 21.4% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 51-75% of their leadership team are parents.
In 32.1% of companies that offer fertility benefits, 76-100% of their leadership team are parents.
In 32% of companies that offer fertility benefits, respondents didn’t know what percentage of those in leadership are parents.

Financial services leads in fertility and family-forming support, followed by professional services and technology. Education trails most industries.

Once the domain of large tech companies, today companies that offer fertility benefits span industries including retail, professional sports, financial services, food and beverage, transportation, entertainment, and more. But there is still more work to do. Our survey found that 25% of financial services companies offer fertility benefits, followed by 21% of professional services, and 21% of technology companies. Education trails most industries with 65% of employees who don’t have access to fertility benefits through their employer.

Industries most likely to have designated fertility benefits

30%
20%
10%
0%
Financial Services
25%
Marketing and advertising
17%
Professional services
21%
Entertainment / news media
14%
Technology
21%
Hospitality and food services
14%

Financial services leads in fertility and family-forming support, followed by professional services and technology. Education trails most industries.

Once the domain of large tech companies, today companies that offer fertility benefits span industries including retail, professional sports, financial services, food and beverage, transportation, entertainment, and more. But there is still more work to do. Our survey found that 25% of financial services companies offer fertility benefits, followed by 21% of professional services, and 21% of technology companies. Education trails most industries with 65% of employees who don’t have access to fertility benefits through their employer.

Industries most likely to have designated fertility benefits

30%
20%
10%
0%

Now is the time to talk about fertility in the workplace

Fertility and family-forming care is a fundamental part of healthcare. For those undergoing fertility treatments or navigating complex family forming such as adoption and surrogacy, the experience is often isolating and can take a heavy toll on their physical and mental health. It can last many months or even years and have a cascading effect on the workplace, impacting recruitment and retention, productivity, and employee health and morale.

There are many ways employers can support employees in their fertility journeys. Normalize conversations around fertility and create a safe space for employees to share their plans. Recognize that fertility care is a vital part of all healthcare for all genders and equally support all paths to parenthood. Provide manager training on how to communicate about fertility and family-forming topics. Designate a private space in offices for injections. Carve out flexible leave policies so employees can care for their physical and mental health without having to use their sick and vacation leave.

Many world-class companies already understand the value of offering financial, medical, and emotional fertility and family-forming support to attract and keep great employees. Though companies cannot — and should not — break the bank to provide financial coverage for fertility care, every company can provide some coverage. Every company can adopt some internal practices to support their employees in this vital part of human healthcare. But it all starts with a conversation.

So let’s start. It’s time to talk about fertility at work.

How could your workplace better support you on your fertility
and family-forming journey?

6%
Said they felt adequately supported
82%
Said more financial resources
68%
Said more work-level resources
43%
Said more emotional resources
42%
Said more open conversations
33%
Said better parent-friendly workplace culture

Now is the time to talk about fertility in the workplace

Fertility and family-forming care is a fundamental part of healthcare. For those undergoing fertility treatments or navigating complex family forming such as adoption and surrogacy, the experience is often isolating and can take a heavy toll on their physical and mental health. It can last many months or even years and have a cascading effect on the workplace, impacting recruitment and retention, productivity, and employee health and morale.

There are many ways employers can support employees in their fertility journeys. Normalize conversations around fertility and create a safe space for employees to share their plans. Recognize that fertility care is a vital part of all healthcare for all genders and equally support all paths to parenthood. Provide manager training on how to communicate about fertility and family-forming topics. Designate a private space in offices for injections. Carve out flexible leave policies so employees can care for their physical and mental health without having to use their sick and vacation leave.

Many world-class companies already understand the value of offering financial, medical, and emotional fertility and family-forming support to attract and keep great employees. Though companies cannot — and should not — break the bank to provide financial coverage for fertility care, every company can provide some coverage. Every company can adopt some internal practices to support their employees in this vital part of human healthcare. But it all starts with a conversation.

So let’s start. It’s time to talk about fertility at work.

How could your workplace better support you on your fertility and family-forming journey?

6%
Said they felt adequately supported
82%
Said more financial resources
68%
Said more work-level resources
43%
Said more emotional resources
42%
Said more open conversations
33%
Said better parent-friendly workplace culture

Demographics and methodology

In May 2021, Carrot Fertility and RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association conducted an online survey to explore the effects of fertility and family forming on employee well-being, retention, and recruitment. The survey was shared via email and social media to RESOLVE’s constituent database and followers and garnered 1,061 responses.

Demographically-speaking, the majority of our respondents were female (97%), followed by male (2%), non-binary (0.3%), and transgender / transgender male (0.1%) respondents. Respondents were split across age groups with 7% in the 25-29 range, 31% in the 30-34 range, 37% in the 35-39 range, and 5% in the 45-49 range. The majority of respondents are married or in a domestic partnership (94%), followed by single (3%) and dating seriously (3%). Less than 1% responded that they are dating casually.

About Carrot and RESOLVE

Carrot Fertility is the leading global fertility benefits provider for employers, built to support employees through their entire fertility healthcare journey. Companies use Carrot to customize a fertility benefit that provides employees financial, medical, and emotional support as they pursue parenthood, reducing healthcare costs and resulting in better clinical outcomes. Carrot's clinically-managed program includes fertility preservation like egg, embryo, and sperm freezing; in vitro fertilization (IVF), donor and gestational carrier services, and adoption; Carrot Rx®, a premium pharmacy experience, at significant savings; Carrot Pregnancy; and the Carrot Card®, a flexible fertility benefits debit card employees can use to pay for their care. Carrot supports companies in more than 55 countries across North America, Asia, Europe, South America, and the Middle East.

Established in 1974, RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association is a non-profit organization with the only established, nationwide network mandated to promote reproductive health and to ensure equal access to all family building options for men and women experiencing infertility or other reproductive disorders. One in eight U.S. couples of childbearing age is diagnosed with infertility. RESOLVE addresses this public health issue by providing community to these women and men, connecting them with others who can help, empowering them to find resolution and giving voice to their demands for access to all family building options.

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